Texas Welcomes Ingrid’s Work With Great Enthusiasm

Sometimes you have to leave to come home…

Ingrid was born and raised in Dallas, Texas.  She left as a young adult to pursue life in Europe, New York and later Aspen.  But Texas never forgot her.. or her talent.  In October of last year, well known Houston art lover and philanthropist, Carolyn Farb, commissioned Ingrid to do an altar for her home.  Creating a commissioned work of art is certainly a challenge, but an altar is so personal and spiritual, it brought the experience to lofty heights.

Cherished-Echoes-from-Afar36x59-rt-angleIngrid worked on the piece for over six months and the results are nothing less than stunning.  The journey not only produced a spectacular work of art, but also a deep artistic connection between the two women.  The altar was installed in mid-April and Carolyn and Ingrid met each other for first time in person, but also as long time kindred spirits.

Detailed images of the Cherished Echoes from Afar

Progress photos of Cherished Echoes from Afar, commissioned altar

On April 15th, Carolyn Farb generously opened her home to honor the new installation.  Friends and art lovers from  Aspen, Houston and New York City came to the event to share her enthusiasm.  Enjoy the photos from the event.

Warmest thanks to Carolyn Farb for her love of art, generous spirit, and hospitality!



Ingrid’s Newest Commission Installed in Denver

Ingrid began her most challenging commission more than a year ago.  It was just completed and installed in the owner’s home this past Wednesday.  The monumental piece entitled, “Goya’s Muse” combines the transparent images of two of Goya’s most well known paintings, “The Duchess of Alba in White” and the “Duchess of Alba in Black.”


Goya’s history with the Duchess of Alba is not fully known, but it seems likely Goya was in love with her.  In the painting nicknamed, “White Duchess” one can see “Solo Goya” (only Goya) written in the sand.  The Black Duchess was painted shortly after the Duchess of Alba’s husband died.  In it we see her wearing her mourning dress, but not so much sad as defiant.

Goya's Muse Detail

Ingrid’s challenge was to combine the two paintings into her own work.  To do this, she made both images so transparent, the viewer can see through both and to the background beneath.  They stand over one another, different versions of the same woman, but also part of each other.  Ingrid placed many of her familiar objects into the work to denote time: clocks, sand and an hourglass.  Also quite challenging was the scale of the work.  Standing at almost 7 feet high (213cm) and nearly as wide, it was extremely difficult to handle the large panels and became quite heavy, about 150lbs.  In both works the Duchess is standing on the beach, Ingrid wanted to create the illusion of the sand in motion.  Using industrial glue and solvent, she created a frozen seascape of sand and shells that looks like a slice of the beach.

Goya's Muse, Detail

Off to the right of the monumental portrait of the two duchesses is the tiny portrait of her dog.  Ingrid decided to place the dog in a separate box and frame so it would not lose its importance in the large piece.  He stands alone on a bed of shells and sand, illuminated by hidden lights in the box, but also connected to the duchess by a gold chain.  The effect is at once poignant and humorous.  For all her importance and nobility the duchess couldn’t be without her little dog.

Duchess's dog

Thank you Brad and Penny for commissioning Ingrid to do this challenging work, for your patience and trust.  She is grateful and honored to have created a work of art so special for you.

Ingrid’s Recently Completed Commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid recently completed a commission for a Colorado client.  You can see from the photo how large it is, nearly 7 feet tall.  It was a challenging piece that was started in March and finished in mid August.  We asked her a few questions about working on this piece and commissions in general.

Was the size of this piece a challenge?

I love working on large pieces, it allows me the space to express my visual ideas.  But it is also physically very demanding.  Just the shear size of the panels and weight can be hard on my body.  [The final piece was well over 100 pounds requiring two persons to move it.]  I’m very proud of this piece.  It brought out some new ideas and challenged old ones.”

Working on a commission

Working on a commission

Are there more commissions in the works?

Oh yes, I’m working on one now I’m very excited about.  And there is another in the idea stage.

Working on the commission

Working on a commission

How long does a commission take to complete?

That’s not easy to answer.  It depends how busy I am, if I’m working towards a show.  And it depends on how large the piece is.  But all things being normal (which they never are) I usually tell the client to allow 4 to 6 months.  If I can do them quicker, I always do.

Do you put more effort into a commission?

I pour my heart into every piece I create.

working on the commission

Working on a commission

Would you advise collectors to buy a completed piece or wait for a commission?

It depends on the collector, but I usually advise that they buy the piece they fall in love with when they see it.  If that piece is already sold, let’s talk.  I can’t do the same piece twice, but I can create something similar.  Some collectors are wary of commissions, that they may not be as good as the works the artist creates for himself.  If they are uncomfortable, I suggest they wait for new work.  But it might help to remember that many of the greatest works of art were commissions: the Mona Lisa, for example.  And many great renaissance painters only painted works for patrons on commission.  Some collectors are worried that they won’t like a commission piece when it’s done and they’ll be stuck with it.  That’s never happened with any of my collectors, but I understand their concern.  Each person has to judge their own comfort level about doing a commission.  Either way, it always works out.