Ingrid’s Recently Completed Commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid recently completed a commission for a Colorado client.  You can see from the photo how large it is, nearly 7 feet tall.  It was a challenging piece that was started in March and finished in mid August.  We asked her a few questions about working on this piece and commissions in general.

Was the size of this piece a challenge?

I love working on large pieces, it allows me the space to express my visual ideas.  But it is also physically very demanding.  Just the shear size of the panels and weight can be hard on my body.  [The final piece was well over 100 pounds requiring two persons to move it.]  I’m very proud of this piece.  It brought out some new ideas and challenged old ones.”

Working on a commission

Working on a commission

Are there more commissions in the works?

Oh yes, I’m working on one now I’m very excited about.  And there is another in the idea stage.

Working on the commission

Working on a commission

How long does a commission take to complete?

That’s not easy to answer.  It depends how busy I am, if I’m working towards a show.  And it depends on how large the piece is.  But all things being normal (which they never are) I usually tell the client to allow 4 to 6 months.  If I can do them quicker, I always do.

Do you put more effort into a commission?

I pour my heart into every piece I create.

working on the commission

Working on a commission

Would you advise collectors to buy a completed piece or wait for a commission?

It depends on the collector, but I usually advise that they buy the piece they fall in love with when they see it.  If that piece is already sold, let’s talk.  I can’t do the same piece twice, but I can create something similar.  Some collectors are wary of commissions, that they may not be as good as the works the artist creates for himself.  If they are uncomfortable, I suggest they wait for new work.  But it might help to remember that many of the greatest works of art were commissions: the Mona Lisa, for example.  And many great renaissance painters only painted works for patrons on commission.  Some collectors are worried that they won’t like a commission piece when it’s done and they’ll be stuck with it.  That’s never happened with any of my collectors, but I understand their concern.  Each person has to judge their own comfort level about doing a commission.  Either way, it always works out.

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Three New Experimental Works by Ingrid

Lost in a Dream by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“Lost in a Dream” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Ingrid has completed three experimental works recently.  These rich, subtle pieces are different from most of her work.  Each is nearly monochrome with splashes of intense color from the butterflies or other objects.  The main subject seems to hide in the background like an apparition, either fading into the background or emerging into our foreground.  There are fewer layers on these pieces, yet they appear almost more three dimensional.  Some so realistic, the figure seems to hover on the verge of life.  Haunting, subtle, beautiful, Ingrid has created three incredible new works.  Please post your comments, we’d love to hear your thoughts.

PS:  The codpiece on the “King of Renaissance” is a real wasp’s nest!

King of Renaissance by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“King of Renaissance” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Queen of Masquerade by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“Queen of Masquerade” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

 

 

Exhibition details released for July 5th and 6th

Here is the official Press Release for the upcoming Exhibition in Vail this week.  We are excited for this Thursday, hope to see you there!

A Cameo Performance

A Cameo Performance by Ingrid Dee Magidson

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Transparent Canvases of Artist Ingrid Dee Magidson to be Featured at  Galerie Zuger in Vail

VAIL, Colorado (July 2, 2012) – On Thursday and Friday, July 5th and 6th Galerie Zuger will be presenting the innovative artwork of Ingrid Dee Magidson.  The artist will be at the receptions for both evenings.  Magidson, a Colorado artist, has been showing her transparent canvases for just over five years.  In that short time, she has captured the attention of numerous museums and prominent collectors, including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, The Whitney, the Hermitage Museum Foundation and Antonio Banderas and Melanie Griffith.  This exhibition, her second at Galerie Zuger Vail is titled, “The Illusion of Time.”

Magidson mixes modern materials and renaissance images to capture what she calls “the illusory nature of time.”   In the piece “The Butterfly Effect” Magidson presents a beautiful renaissance woman in a classic pose.  But she is ghostly and transparent.  One can see through the subject into the layers beneath.  Butterflies hover in and around her as if in full flight.  Images, musical sheets, antique jewelry and manuscripts can be seen through her.  The more the viewer looks, the more is revealed.

To create this floating effect, Magidson uses layers of acrylic, collage and objects in a kind of three dimensional assemblage or transparent canvas.  As the viewer moves around the artwork, hidden objects reveal themselves and others disappear.  It is a kind of reverse illusion; what appears flat is actually three dimensional and the objects that are three dimensional appear flat.  Once involved, it is difficult to look away.

Magidson is no stranger to art.  Both her parents are artists, as is her identical twin sister.  Her husband is an art dealer and writer, whom she met at his art gallery.  Asked how she came up with her unique style of art Magidson said:

“I used to go to museums with my parents as a child.  I never forgot the paintings I saw and wondered how many other beautiful paintings were tucked away in storage that no one would see.  Later, as an artist, I decided to bring these paintings and the people they depicted back to life.  I couldn’t just paint them in an ordinary way – that had been done before.  So I started playing with modern materials and techniques. Those first exploratory months were the most challenging and darkest times of my life, but I finally had a break-through and it made all those moments worth it.”

There will be two receptions with the artist in attendance, Thursday, July 5th and Friday, July 6th from 3 to 7pm both nights.  The exhibition will continue for two weeks.   Galeryie Zuger Vail is on the second floor of the Solaris building in the heart of Vail, Colorado.

For More Information:

Rayla Kundolf
art@galeriezugervail.com
(970) 476-5619

Documentary of Ingrid Magidson’s Work Wins 2012 Telly Award

Congratulations to The Reid Effect of Pioria, AZ for their recent award of a Silver Telly (highest honor) for “Windows Through Time” a documentary of Ingrid Dee Magidson’s art work.

Rob Reid came to the studio of Ingrid Dee Magidson in Colorado in the fall of 2010 to record and interview Ingrid and Jay Magidson.  He and his film crew were on site for three days filming and interviewing the artist and her husband.  It was a unique experience to say the least.  Rob is a consummate professional.  He has a way of making you feel at ease even in the most difficult shots.  For example, Ingrid was retelling the story of her youth, about particular difficulties that ultimately led her to a life of art.  At one point, she was overwhelmed with emotion and was unable to continue.  Rob respected the emotion and the moment.  He never hurried her or tried to move on, he simply waited, “when you’re ready, we’ll continue.”

Filming moved into Ingrid’s studio.  This was not an easy place to shoot.  It is very crowded and the light is difficult.  Ingrid’s work has many reflective surfaces that make it very difficult to photograph.  Rob and his crew moved in without a complaint, setting up lights and reflectors and in no time they were filming.  Take a look at the final minutes of the film, it shows some very creative shots that Rob came up with where Ingrid is on the other side of the art.

Thank you Rob and congratulations on your much deserved award.

2012 Silver Telly Award to The Reid Effect for Film Documentary, “Windows Through Time,” the work of Ingrid Dee Magidson

An In-depth Look at a New Work by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Whispered Memories by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Whispered Memories by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Whispered Memories is one of 12 new works featured at the upcoming one-woman exhibition for Ingrid Dee Magidson in Vail, July 5th.  Mysterious and thought provoking, it is a good example of her recent work.  Once again, Ingrid challenges herself to reach beyond the expected into the unknown.

Whispered Memories - detail

Whispered Memories – detail

We feel a great sense of time with this piece.  The little boy has long since grown up, lived, died, was buried and has long ago turned to dust.  Yet here he is again, as if reawakened from a dream.  The butterflies flying around his head, give the viewer a feeling that he just ran in long enough to get his portrait painted, and ran back out to play.  His clothes and hat reveal a deeper sophistication, however.  And his haunting eyes show a thoughtful look far past his young years.

Whispered Memories - Detail

Whispered Memories – Detail

When we look closer, we find an entire life woven into the boy’s figure.  His clothes are not just fabric but stories, mythology and adventure.  One see’s cupid and other cherubs.  But there are also kings, battles and castles, an entire life layered here.  It is the boy’s future, now our past, that is merged impossibly together.

Whispered Memories - Detail

Whispered Memories – Detail

One necessarily moves back to the boys face, cherubic and beautiful, but fractured.  Ingrid has layered it in such a way as to show a break under the eyes.  The mind dreams of the future, the eyes see past us beyond even our own lifetimes.  But the heart and body are separate from the mind, part of the past and history.  It is this fracture that keeps up coming back to his beautiful young face, the past and the future trapped in his small body.

Whispered Memories - Detail

Whispered Memories – Detail

Whispered Memories is about all of us, about our link to our own childhood, when we gazed into the future unafraid, without care for the past.  But as we get older, our future shrinks, and our past grows, the two threatening to tear apart from each other.  But they don’t tear us apart, the stay joined.  And just like Whispered Memories, we hold the impossible together.

Whispered Memories and 11 other works by Ingrid Dee Magidson will be featured at her One-Woman Exhibition opening July 5th and 6th at Galerie Zuger, Vail, 6 to 9pm both nights.  The exhibition continues for three weeks.

Ingrid Working Hard on her Upcoming Exhibition

Ingrid Video Shoot - May 21st

Video Shoot of Ingrid Working on her Upcoming Exhibition

Ingrid is working like crazy toward her Vail exhibition opening July 5th.  Today we worked on short videos of each piece (coming soon).  She has finished eight pieces and continues to work hard on more.  Ingrid took a short break from the studio so we could film her talking about her recent creations.  You have to work quickly to catch Ingrid between her studio and her family.   Busy, but what could be better than doing what you love.

The exhibition titled “The Illusion of Time” features some of her most experimental pieces to date.  Short videos will be on the web site and blog in the next few days.  In the meantime, you can look at still images on Ingrid’s website at: www.IngridMagidson.com.

“The Illusion of Time”
One Person Exhibition of Recent Work by Ingrid Dee Magidson
Reception July 5 and 6, 6 to 9 pm.
Galerie Zuger Vail
Solaris Building, Vail