Ingrid Dee Magidson – Incarnazioni (Incarnations)

Enjoy this terrific article released today on Centro Sociale dell’Arte.  The Article is in Italian and English, so scroll down to the language of your choice.  Lots of images too.  Be sure to click on the link to see the whole article.

Words Social Forum

Ingrid Dee Magidson – Incarnazioni

 

Memories of a Winter's Garden

 

Ingrid Dee Magidson è un’artista statunitense originaria di Dallas, Texas. Vive e lavora ad Aspen, Colorado, dove ha il suo studio e crea le sue stupefacenti opere d’Arte. Famosa in tutto il mondo, le sue opere fanno parte di notevoli collezioni fra cui: Antonio Banderasvia…

Ingrid Dee Magidson – Incarnazioni.

Ingrid’s Recently Completed Commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission
Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid recently completed a commission for a Colorado client.  You can see from the photo how large it is, nearly 7 feet tall.  It was a challenging piece that was started in March and finished in mid August.  We asked her a few questions about working on this piece and commissions in general.

Was the size of this piece a challenge?

I love working on large pieces, it allows me the space to express my visual ideas.  But it is also physically very demanding.  Just the shear size of the panels and weight can be hard on my body.  [The final piece was well over 100 pounds requiring two persons to move it.]  I’m very proud of this piece.  It brought out some new ideas and challenged old ones.”

Working on a commission
Working on a commission

Are there more commissions in the works?

Oh yes, I’m working on one now I’m very excited about.  And there is another in the idea stage.

Working on the commission
Working on a commission

How long does a commission take to complete?

That’s not easy to answer.  It depends how busy I am, if I’m working towards a show.  And it depends on how large the piece is.  But all things being normal (which they never are) I usually tell the client to allow 4 to 6 months.  If I can do them quicker, I always do.

Do you put more effort into a commission?

I pour my heart into every piece I create.

working on the commission
Working on a commission

Would you advise collectors to buy a completed piece or wait for a commission?

It depends on the collector, but I usually advise that they buy the piece they fall in love with when they see it.  If that piece is already sold, let’s talk.  I can’t do the same piece twice, but I can create something similar.  Some collectors are wary of commissions, that they may not be as good as the works the artist creates for himself.  If they are uncomfortable, I suggest they wait for new work.  But it might help to remember that many of the greatest works of art were commissions: the Mona Lisa, for example.  And many great renaissance painters only painted works for patrons on commission.  Some collectors are worried that they won’t like a commission piece when it’s done and they’ll be stuck with it.  That’s never happened with any of my collectors, but I understand their concern.  Each person has to judge their own comfort level about doing a commission.  Either way, it always works out.

Ingrid’s Gift of Art to Her Husband

The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson
The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Ingrid gave me this glorious work of art yesterday.  Let me share a little of what this means to me.  Ingrid is my wife of 16 years.  In that time we have experienced many things, children, challenges, joys, all of them wrapped in love.  We have always shared our creative spirits with each other.  When she began working on this piece, “The Oracle,” she asked me what I thought.  “You must keep it, it is magnificent.”  I replied.  Instead of keeping it, she gave it to me.  But it is much more than a great work of art, it is a connection to us, our family, our inspirations, even our mentors.

The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson - Detail
The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson – Detail

A brief history of the artwork

The central figure is from a painting by our dearest friend and art mentor, Eva Cellini.  Now in her late eighties, Eva has been an inspiration to both Ingrid and me; Ingrid for her art and me for my writing.  Beneath the woman are the components of many dismantled computers.  My son and I got the joy of pulling them apart.  Ingrid knows my love of all things technological and sci-fi.  The butterflies were opened and chosen by my daughter; take a close look, one is impossibly beautiful, transparent.

The-Oracle-20x15-butterfly-detail
The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson – Detail

The oracle doesn’t have a right eye, in its place is a laser emitter.  It cuts through the fog of time and reveals the truth.  Her gown is made up of music, the sounds of beauty and art.  And she is floating above all that technology.  She is not denying technology, her eye is made of it after all.  No, she accepts it, uses it where appropriate, but is not overwhelmed or in love with it, and it is part of her.  She weaves music, art, technology, nature and time into her prophesies.

The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson - Detail
The Oracle by Ingrid Dee Magidson – Detail

It is a wonderful piece, personal and beautiful.  I am grateful to a beneficent universe that would put me together with my amazing wife.  Thank you.

A Detailed Look at Masquerade – Newest Work by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Queen of Masquerade by Ingrid Dee Magidson
Queen of Masquerade 55 x 35 inches

Ingrid’s newest work, Queen of Masquerade is unique in many ways, even for her.  In it she experiments with new materials to give a different illusion of depth and dimension.  Masquerade, along with several other new works are made with acrylic, wood, butterflies and objects.  Unlike her traditional work, the image is not transparent, but sits as the furthermost layer.   The other objects sit in front of it, solid and weighty.  The closest layer to the viewer is clear acrylic (Plexiglas) drawn with a fine grid, and a hint of misty paint.  That’s the structure of the work.  Let’s look inside and at some of the symbolism set there.

At first look, one sees the overall form of Countess Cecil, her mask against the dark background.  Masquerade  has a somber ghost-like quality that speaks of time, history, perhaps an ancient ball that the countess might have attended.  Its monochromatic theme is only slightly broken by the bright flowers and butterflies.  Even with the splashes of color, darkness pervades the piece.  One might be tempted to stop here, interested enough in the overall mood and feeling of the piece.  It is hauntingly beautiful in its entirety, but let’s move in for a closer look.

Queen of Masquerade Detail - face
Queen of Masquerade – Detail (click to enlarge)

As with all portraits, we are drawn to the subject’s eyes.  In this case, peeking through the ballroom mask, we find Countess Cecil’s haunting eyes.  Cecil was a very beautiful woman, we can see that now.  She was also confident of her beauty as she looks back at us, unafraid.  The wasp’s nest which makes up her headdress suggests something of a sting.  Gratefully this is softened by the feathers, soft and beautiful.  The white butterfly to her left symbolizes life and beauty and the fleeting nature of both.  Cecil may have been beautiful, powerful in her day, but she, like all living things, has been recaptured by time.

Queen of Masquerade detail hand
Queen of Masquerade – detail

We move our attention down to Cecil’s hands in the center of the artwork.  In her right she lightly holds a fan, perhaps suggesting a bit coquetry.  In her left hand a corsage of feathers balances that of the headdress.  Cultures across time, countries, even continents are more similar than they are different.  This is the same in Masquerade, suggesting that the countess could be African, Asian as easily as European royalty.

Queen of Masquerade - detail butterfly
Queen of Masquerade – detail

At the bottom of the art we see the surprising detail and depth which makes this such an interesting work.  The white butterfly seems to have landed on Cecil’s dress, which is deeply folded, and dark against the intricate patterns of the rich carpet.  We also see a portion of the grid which Ingrid has painted on the surface.  It gives us a sense of separation, a kind of window that we are looking through, or Countess Cecil is looking out of.  It is a metaphor for time, that which ultimately separates the subject from the viewer.  Transparent, but impenetrable.
The Queen of Masquerade is an example of how Ingrid continues to experiment with her work, breaking through barriers.  A dear friend and artist described this new body of work, as “bold and fearless.”  And indeed it is.

You can view the rest of Ingrid’s new work on her web site at www.IngridMagidson.com.

Three New Experimental Works by Ingrid

Lost in a Dream by Ingrid Dee Magidson
“Lost in a Dream” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Ingrid has completed three experimental works recently.  These rich, subtle pieces are different from most of her work.  Each is nearly monochrome with splashes of intense color from the butterflies or other objects.  The main subject seems to hide in the background like an apparition, either fading into the background or emerging into our foreground.  There are fewer layers on these pieces, yet they appear almost more three dimensional.  Some so realistic, the figure seems to hover on the verge of life.  Haunting, subtle, beautiful, Ingrid has created three incredible new works.  Please post your comments, we’d love to hear your thoughts.

PS:  The codpiece on the “King of Renaissance” is a real wasp’s nest!

King of Renaissance by Ingrid Dee Magidson
“King of Renaissance” by Ingrid Dee Magidson
Queen of Masquerade by Ingrid Dee Magidson
“Queen of Masquerade” by Ingrid Dee Magidson