Reflection by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Ingrid recently completed her artwork honoring Catherine the Great.

Reflection by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“Reflection” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

The intricately layered mixed-media work is entitled “Reflection.”  It is an homage to the Hermitage and its founder Catherine the Great:

“I am deeply inspired by men and women who have changed the world profoundly.  Catherine the Great was one of these women.  I wanted to capture her essence in this piece.  Deeply rooted inside her soul, she knew her purpose and her destiny.  With that inner driven passion, she alone helped give the world one of the greatest gifts to its future, the Hermitage Museum.

In this piece Reflection, Catherine is shown in her coronation gown along with her crown.  The viewer is able to look into her dress to see a present-day Hermitage – a view towards the future.  Surrounding her to the right and underneath are many portraits of her family, her husband, and her lovers who influenced her and formed her life.  Like a family tree, I’ve included branches to represent their connection to Catherine.
"Reflection" by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“Reflection” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

To the left of the main portrait, the viewer can see a reflection of Catherine.  It is ghostlike, representing the lasting impression of her life echoing into eternity.  Like the butterflies, each of us lives only a brief time, but can leave a permanent mark.  Also, if the viewer looks into Catherine’s reflection at the correct angle, they will see themselves.  This is symbolic of how each of us never actually sees oneself, but only a reflection as seen through the eyes of another.”
-Ingrid Dee Magidson, 2012
 
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Ingrid’s Recently Completed Commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid with her recently completed commission

Ingrid recently completed a commission for a Colorado client.  You can see from the photo how large it is, nearly 7 feet tall.  It was a challenging piece that was started in March and finished in mid August.  We asked her a few questions about working on this piece and commissions in general.

Was the size of this piece a challenge?

I love working on large pieces, it allows me the space to express my visual ideas.  But it is also physically very demanding.  Just the shear size of the panels and weight can be hard on my body.  [The final piece was well over 100 pounds requiring two persons to move it.]  I’m very proud of this piece.  It brought out some new ideas and challenged old ones.”

Working on a commission

Working on a commission

Are there more commissions in the works?

Oh yes, I’m working on one now I’m very excited about.  And there is another in the idea stage.

Working on the commission

Working on a commission

How long does a commission take to complete?

That’s not easy to answer.  It depends how busy I am, if I’m working towards a show.  And it depends on how large the piece is.  But all things being normal (which they never are) I usually tell the client to allow 4 to 6 months.  If I can do them quicker, I always do.

Do you put more effort into a commission?

I pour my heart into every piece I create.

working on the commission

Working on a commission

Would you advise collectors to buy a completed piece or wait for a commission?

It depends on the collector, but I usually advise that they buy the piece they fall in love with when they see it.  If that piece is already sold, let’s talk.  I can’t do the same piece twice, but I can create something similar.  Some collectors are wary of commissions, that they may not be as good as the works the artist creates for himself.  If they are uncomfortable, I suggest they wait for new work.  But it might help to remember that many of the greatest works of art were commissions: the Mona Lisa, for example.  And many great renaissance painters only painted works for patrons on commission.  Some collectors are worried that they won’t like a commission piece when it’s done and they’ll be stuck with it.  That’s never happened with any of my collectors, but I understand their concern.  Each person has to judge their own comfort level about doing a commission.  Either way, it always works out.

Three New Experimental Works by Ingrid

Lost in a Dream by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“Lost in a Dream” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Ingrid has completed three experimental works recently.  These rich, subtle pieces are different from most of her work.  Each is nearly monochrome with splashes of intense color from the butterflies or other objects.  The main subject seems to hide in the background like an apparition, either fading into the background or emerging into our foreground.  There are fewer layers on these pieces, yet they appear almost more three dimensional.  Some so realistic, the figure seems to hover on the verge of life.  Haunting, subtle, beautiful, Ingrid has created three incredible new works.  Please post your comments, we’d love to hear your thoughts.

PS:  The codpiece on the “King of Renaissance” is a real wasp’s nest!

King of Renaissance by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“King of Renaissance” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

Queen of Masquerade by Ingrid Dee Magidson

“Queen of Masquerade” by Ingrid Dee Magidson

 

 

Exhibition details released for July 5th and 6th

Here is the official Press Release for the upcoming Exhibition in Vail this week.  We are excited for this Thursday, hope to see you there!

A Cameo Performance

A Cameo Performance by Ingrid Dee Magidson

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Transparent Canvases of Artist Ingrid Dee Magidson to be Featured at  Galerie Zuger in Vail

VAIL, Colorado (July 2, 2012) – On Thursday and Friday, July 5th and 6th Galerie Zuger will be presenting the innovative artwork of Ingrid Dee Magidson.  The artist will be at the receptions for both evenings.  Magidson, a Colorado artist, has been showing her transparent canvases for just over five years.  In that short time, she has captured the attention of numerous museums and prominent collectors, including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, The Whitney, the Hermitage Museum Foundation and Antonio Banderas and Melanie Griffith.  This exhibition, her second at Galerie Zuger Vail is titled, “The Illusion of Time.”

Magidson mixes modern materials and renaissance images to capture what she calls “the illusory nature of time.”   In the piece “The Butterfly Effect” Magidson presents a beautiful renaissance woman in a classic pose.  But she is ghostly and transparent.  One can see through the subject into the layers beneath.  Butterflies hover in and around her as if in full flight.  Images, musical sheets, antique jewelry and manuscripts can be seen through her.  The more the viewer looks, the more is revealed.

To create this floating effect, Magidson uses layers of acrylic, collage and objects in a kind of three dimensional assemblage or transparent canvas.  As the viewer moves around the artwork, hidden objects reveal themselves and others disappear.  It is a kind of reverse illusion; what appears flat is actually three dimensional and the objects that are three dimensional appear flat.  Once involved, it is difficult to look away.

Magidson is no stranger to art.  Both her parents are artists, as is her identical twin sister.  Her husband is an art dealer and writer, whom she met at his art gallery.  Asked how she came up with her unique style of art Magidson said:

“I used to go to museums with my parents as a child.  I never forgot the paintings I saw and wondered how many other beautiful paintings were tucked away in storage that no one would see.  Later, as an artist, I decided to bring these paintings and the people they depicted back to life.  I couldn’t just paint them in an ordinary way – that had been done before.  So I started playing with modern materials and techniques. Those first exploratory months were the most challenging and darkest times of my life, but I finally had a break-through and it made all those moments worth it.”

There will be two receptions with the artist in attendance, Thursday, July 5th and Friday, July 6th from 3 to 7pm both nights.  The exhibition will continue for two weeks.   Galeryie Zuger Vail is on the second floor of the Solaris building in the heart of Vail, Colorado.

For More Information:

Rayla Kundolf
art@galeriezugervail.com
(970) 476-5619